What Colour Do Pink and Orange Make When Mixed? Detailed Guide

Can you mix pink and orange and get a new color? Yes! When you combine pink and orange, you create a beautiful new color called pink-orange. This color is perfect for adding a pop of brightness to any project. 

While many people think that pink and orange can not be mixed to get a new color, they create a beautiful shade of Pinkish orange. It is a bright, vibrant color that adds a glass of happiness to any project.

Keep reading to learn more about this unique shade.

Fundamentals of Color Mixing Theory

The basics of color mixing theory are pretty simple. When you mix two colors, you will get a new color created by the two primary colors. For example, when you mix red and blue together, you create a new magenta color. Magenta is a red-ish purple color. 

So how does this apply to creating pink-orange?

If we take our original colors and make a Venn diagram, we can see that the circle’s center demonstrates how they overlap on the spectrum. And from there, we can combine both sets of dots to create an entirely new shade within each group! So from the red side, pink-orange includes all shades on this half of the circle except for pure red or scarlet. And from the orange side, pink-orange consists of all shades except for pure orange, dark orange, or russet. Since the red end of the spectrum is much brighter, pink-orange will be more muted in comparison.

The same theory applies to any two colors across from each other on the color wheel, not just red and yellow! The following image demonstrates how three different colors can be mixed to create a whole new set of colors based on their spectrum overlap.

When you learn about the color mixing theory, it becomes easy to see why many people think they cannot mix these two colors to get a new one. However, when you know where your original colors fall within the entire spectrum, you can easily combine them to create your desired results.

The Color Wheel: The Key to Understanding Color Mixture

color wheel

The color wheel is the first step to understanding color mixing theory. When you spin a color wheel, you can see how colors are arranged next to each other on the spectrum. This provides information about how these two colors will mix.

Spinning this wheel also demonstrates how mixed two opposite colors create different effects, which we discussed above. The following image is an example of what happens when red and green are combined:

Pure red creates a bright, vibrant orange-ish pink shade on one side of the wheel with some subtle hints of magenta. And on the opposite side of the wheel, pure green creates a more muted bluish-green hue with less energy than its original state. So on both ends of the color wheel, these colors are opposite. However, when mixed, the red side of the spectrum is more prominent and results in pink orange instead of a distinctly different color like on the green side.

Pink orange is not just created from mixing red and orange! It has some unique vibrancy that you can only get by combining these two specific shades.

Primary Colors

color wheel 2

The first colors on all color wheels are known as primary colors. These colors cannot be created by mixing other colors (except brown). They include red, yellow and blue. You get secondary colors like green or purple/violet when combining these three colors. You create tertiary hues like orange or turquoise when you mix two secondary colors. Mixing all three primary shades will result in black or gray depending on each color you add.

There are often some variations that occur when creating a pure set of primary colors, and artists and designers may use different shades than the ones reflected in the following diagram:

Using your color wheel, spin around to see where these three primaries fall on the spectrum. As we discussed above, they will always be opposite one another. You can understand more about what happens when mixed by spinning on either side of red/yellow/blue and watching how different combinations create specific results.

For example, yellow is on one end of the spectrum while blue is across from it on the other end. Combining all three primary colors (red + blue + yellow) creates a grayish purple that mimics black and white because all three colors are represented equally.

This is why it doesn’t matter which primary colors you choose to use, as long as they represent the same hues and shades that mix in the way you want them to for your project. For example, if you buy non-photo blue fabric paint to make a design on a light gray shirt, it will not change how much pigment is in the bottle compared to regular blue fabric paint.

The color wheel can also help artists and designers see when two different sets of primary colors will create almost identical results when mixed. Light orange and dark yellow (like in this image) appear very similar when they are present in equal parts.

Secondary Colors

Secondary colors are created when you mix two primary colors. The secondary color wheel includes the three secondary hues that result from mixing two primary shades, which are blue-green (mixing blue and green), red-orange (mixing red and orange), and yellow-purple/violet (mixing yellow and purple).

Again, artists and designers may vary in the shades they use for their secondary colors, but this is a standard set of choices:

The following diagram shows what happens when you mix red and green to create yellow-orange:

On one side of the spectrum, you have bright green with a lot of energy from its original state. Opposite to it is red, which has significantly less energy in its purest form. When you mix these two colors, they share energy from each other and result in a color that appears to be bright orange from the red side of the spectrum.

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To create secondary colors, one primary color is used to “paint” all over a shape, and another primary color is used to paint all over the same form next to it or to overlap it. You can see this happening in this image:

Tertiary Colors

When mixing a secondary hue with a neighboring secondary shade on either end of the spectrum (blue-green with yellow-orange or violet-red with blue-green), you get three different tertiaries. As opposed to using black or gray when mixing all three primaries, tertiaries are colors created by combining two primary colors with the color adjacent to them.

The three tertiary hues on this color wheel are yellow-orange, red-violet, and blue-green. They appear in between their primary neighbors on the spectrum but still contain some characteristics from each of them:

This diagram shows what happens when combining a secondary hue (yellow) with its neighboring secondary shade (blue-green). These result in three new tertiaries called yellow-orange, red-violet, and blue-green.

Each of these is made up of different combinations of the original two hues used to create them. Tertiary Red comprises equal parts primary red and secondary violet, while tertiary blue contains equal amounts of primary blue and secondary green.

Analogous Colors

Analogous colors are hues that appear next to each other on the color wheel. Because they are so close together, they typically go well when used in painting or design work. This can be seen clearly in this image of an analogous color wheel:

The primary hues on the wheel that you see here are red, yellow, and blue. Three secondary hues (orange-red, yellow-green, and blue-violet) and three tertiary hues (red/yellow-orange, orange/yellow-green, and violet/blue-green) make up all twelve of these hues, which is why there are precisely six pairs of analogous colors.

This means that any two adjacent colors on the spectrum (yellow and yellow-orange) would be considered analogous. To prove this, I made a sample using paint:

This is my very amateurish attempt at painting with my new set of paints that come with every Crayola box of crayons. It’s pretty messy, but it shows the idea behind how these colors work together to create a cohesive piece. As you can see here, even though brown isn’t on the color wheel, it still works as an analogous color when paired up together in equal parts from opposite sides of the spectrum. 

It should also be noted that while some colors might not seem to look good next to each other when placed next to each other on a sheet of paper or computer screen, they may work well in a real-life environment. This is because specific colors have different vibes depending on the situation that they’re placed in.

Complementary Colors

Complementary colors are hues directly across from each other on the color wheel. If they were mixed, they would cancel each other out and black. In this case, the color wheel shows primary colors: red, yellow, and blue. Three secondary colors (orange-red, yellow-green, and blue-violet) and three tertiary colors (red/yellow-orange, orange/yellow-green, and violet/blue-green) make up all twelve hues which are why there are precisely six pairs of complementary colors.

This means that any pair of opposite colors on the spectrum (red and green) would be considered complementary. To this, I made another sample using paint:

This is my very amateurish attempt at painting with my new set of paints that come with every Crayola box of crayons. It’s pretty messy, but it shows the idea behind how these colors work to create a cohesive piece. As you can see here, even though brown isn’t on the color wheel, it still works as a complementary color when paired up together in equal parts from opposite sides of the spectrum.

It should also be noted that while some colors might not seem to look good next to each other when placed next to each other on a sheet of paper or computer screen, they may work well in a real-life environment. This is because specific colors have different vibes depending on the situation that they’re placed in.

What Happens When You Mix Orange and Pink Together?

So now that you understand the theory behind how colors work, what happens when you mix orange and pink together? This combination creates an amalgamation of oranges and pinks that are bright, bold, and beautiful.

When you mix red with yellow, the color becomes more vibrant because these hues are opposite on the color wheel. This is even more true for pink-orange since it is created by mixing red with orange directly across the color wheel! Combining these two colors takes them to a whole new level! 

This also means that if you want to create light pink or bright orange shades, this will be an excellent base to start with. When you begin with pink or orange as your primary hue, you will have a much easier time creating the color you want.

Pink orange is a perfect additive color for any project because it is bright, happy, and sure to catch people’s attention. Try adding this color to your next art piece or even your fall wardrobe! You can use a combination of pinks and oranges together to create beautiful new shades that are unique from anything you would get on their own. 

How many other shades can you create by mixing orange and pink together? 

Since pink and orange are such a popular color combination, there are many other shades that you can create to make your project unique.

The following is a list of all the different colors that are created when you mix these two hues:

pink/orange – the original color combination that we talked about above. This will often fall into light or medium pink shade.

Coral – a slightly more orange shade of pink perfect for creating beautiful brights.

Light coral is a more golden color than the regular version; this hue has less orange, and the pink is much more noticeable.

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Bright coral – add a little watermelon red to your pinks and oranges! This vibrant color will make any project stand out.

Light pink/orange – if you want to create a more subtle color with less orange, try this version instead of the regular bright orange/pink.

Apricot – use this shade for fashion or home decorating projects that need to be warm and inviting. It’s also great for autumn.

Peach – like apricot, peach is perfect for creating inviting environments with its soft hues.

Salmon – another great nature-inspired tone, salmon can be combined with deep browns or turquoise to represent water.

Light mauve/coral – take your pinks and oranges down a notch by adding purple into the mix! This color will be more golden than coral but still has pink undertones.

Light pink/gold – if you want to make your pinks and oranges pop, even more, turn up the intensity with this version that adds a touch of gold into the mix!

Can You Make Orange Color From Pink?

Yes, orange color can be made from pink. The following are the steps on how to make an orange color from pink:

  1. Mix red with yellow to get orange. 
  2. Use this in making light colors for your project. 
  3. Mix magenta and yellow together, which you can also use for light colors in your project. 

If you want a darker shade of orange, mix red with brown, which gives you a dark orange color commonly used in autumn projects.

Frequently Asked Questions

Conclusion

All colors can be mixed, but some of them may create another hue that you might not want. Mixing two colors like pink and orange make a new color. This new color is purple. It is not recommended to mix blue and red because they will be brown.

Adding more white to the original mixture can also help get lighter shades! You have to experiment with different ingredients until you find the perfect match for your project.

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